Zither US http://zither.us/rss.xml en Zither Newsletters http://zither.us/zither.newsletters <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Zither Newsletters</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2016-01-29T02:14:15+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 01/29/2016 - 02:14</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In 1879, Franz Waldecker published the first newsletter in the United States for the zither community. <i>The Zitherplayer</i>, in its way, brought together zither players throughout the states and Europe by sharing music, news and other articles of interest to promote the art of zither playing. From this time, several periodicals emerged and this page shares many of these early examples. If the reader is aware of others not presented here, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form to help build a more contiguous picture.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/znusa.jpg" /><br /> </center> <table border="1"> <tr> <td><b>Index</b></td> <td><b>Issue</b></td> <td><b>Publication</b></td> <td><b>Notes</b></td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0001.pdf">NL-0001</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 1, February, 1922</td> <td>The Zither</td> <td>Code: C / John C. Scherer, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0002.pdf">NL-0002</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 2, July, 1922</td> <td>The Zither</td> <td>Code: C / John C. Scherer, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0003.pdf">NL-0003</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 3, September, 1922</td> <td>The Zither</td> <td>Code: C / John C. Scherer, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0004.pdf">NL-0004</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 1, January 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0005.pdf">NL-0005</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 2, February 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0006.pdf">NL-0006</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 3, March 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0007.pdf">NL-0007</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 4, April 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0008.pdf">NL-0008</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 5, May 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0009.pdf">NL-0009</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 6, June 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0010.pdf">NL-0010</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 7, July 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0011.pdf">NL-0011</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 8, August 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0012.pdf">NL-0012</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 9, September 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0013.pdf">NL-0013</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 12, December 1, 1885</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0014.pdf">NL-0014</a></td> <td>Vol II, No. 1, January 1, 1886</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0015.pdf">NL-0015</a></td> <td>Vol II, No. 8, August 1, 1886</td> <td>The Zitherplayer</td> <td>Code: O / O. G. Eckstein, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0016.pdf">NL-0016</a></td> <td>Vol I, No. 1, December, 1962</td> <td>The Zither Newsletter</td> <td>Code: O / Dr. Joel Morris, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0017.pdf">NL-0017</a></td> <td>Vol II, No. 1, June, 1963</td> <td>The Zither Newsletter</td> <td>Code: O / Dr. Joel Morris, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0018.pdf">NL-0018</a></td> <td>Vol II, No. II, December, 1963</td> <td>The Zither Newsletter</td> <td>Code: O / Dr. Joel Morris, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0019.pdf">NL-0019</a></td> <td>July, 1964</td> <td>The Zither Newsletter</td> <td>Code: O / Dr. Joel Morris, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0020.pdf">NL-0020</a></td> <td>Spring 1987</td> <td>Zither Newsletter of U.S.A</td> <td>Code: O / Janet Stessl, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0021.pdf">NL-0021</a></td> <td>Summer 1987</td> <td>Zither Newsletter of U.S.A</td> <td>Code: O / Janet Stessl, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0022.pdf">NL-0022</a></td> <td>Fall 1987</td> <td>Zither Newsletter of U.S.A</td> <td>Code: O / Janet Stessl, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0023.pdf">NL-0023</a></td> <td>Winter 1988</td> <td>Zither Newsletter of U.S.A</td> <td>Code: O / Janet Stessl, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0024.pdf">NL-0024</a></td> <td>Winter 1989</td> <td>Zither Newsletter of U.S.A</td> <td>Code: O / Janet Stessl, Editor</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/nl0025.pdf">NL-0025</a></td> <td>Spring 1989</td> <td>Zither Newsletter of U.S.A</td> <td>Code: O / Janet Stessl, Editor</td> </tr> </table> <p></p><center><br /> <img src="files/footer.jpg" /><br /> </center> <p> Do you have a zither-related materials that you would like to share? For more information on how to contribute, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a> or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</p> </div> Fri, 29 Jan 2016 02:14:15 +0000 davidkyger 138 at http://zither.us A Snapshot of Pauline Kruger Hamilton http://zither.us/zitherist.pauline.kruger <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Snapshot of Pauline Kruger Hamilton</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2014-04-29T18:50:57+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 04/29/2014 - 18:50</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>An early photograph reveals an extraordinary life. The photo, circa 1893, was taken in St. Paul, Minnesota and shows Pauline Kruger Hamilton with her Arion zither. A native of Minneapolis, Minnesota, she performed as a zither soloist and was a well known artist. For a number of years, she was designated as the official photographer for the court of Franz Josef, former Emperor of Austria.</i><br /> </p><center><img src="files/fslogo.png" /><br /> </center> <p>In a chapel, two Special Agents from the Bureau of Investigation gazed down upon the body of a woman lying in a coffin. The men from the Bureau had received a tip that papers had been secreted with the body. Near the deceased woman's right hand, a portrait of a man was observed. The agents noted how the collar had been obscured, as if to conceal something. On the photograph, the name “Hamilton” was written on the diagonal. No other papers were found.

 </p> <p>Thus the final days of Pauline Kruger Hamilton were marked with suspicion and intrigue. A scene suitable, it seems, to fill a few frames in The Third Man movie. For weeks she had been shadowed by an investigative firm in New York City. Detectives received reports of odd behavior and the many guests she received. One entry in her now declassified file reads:</p> <p>“May 18, 1918 , they received information (no name given) that a Mrs. Pauline Krueger [SIC] of 12 W. 47th Street, N. Y. formerly photographer to the Kaiser, was signalling [SIC] from her apartment overlooking the river to ships in the river. Was associating with questionable characters; was an expert at wigwagging.”</p> <p>For years, Pauline was court photographer for the royal family in Vienna. How much of the rest is truth, or a product of the paranoia of the time, is hard to say. As America entered the first World War, her numerous foreign connections were a magnet for suspicion. She was, after all, well connected to nobility in Austria. Her position with the royal family in Vienna gave her access that others in her profession could only dream of. Since the onset of World War I, she was an ambassador for Austria's war orphans and made pleas for cotton in order to improve the sanitary conditions of soldiers, whether friend or foe.

</p> <p>In 1870, Pauline Kruger was born in Middleton, Wisconsin, to parents who were counted among the state's many German-Americans. In 1880, the family moved to Minneapolis, shortly after the sudden death of Pauline's three youngest siblings from diphtheria. The relocation was perhaps intended as a healing measure, to place the family some distance from the tragedy.</p> <p>An artist by profession, she established an art studio at the Syndicate Block Building on Nicollet Avenue by 5th and 6th Street. Numerous private exhibitions of her work were held there, followed shortly thereafter by public viewings. Her studio was a workspace and social circle where guests frequently gathered for small talk and tea served from a Russian samovar.

</p> <p>It is the cabinet card photo shown here that drew in this author. Here we see an attractive woman, wasp-waisted in the style of the day, posing with an Arion model zither that is positioned upright and leaning against a chair. Outside of her studio, she performed zither solos at various public venues. She also enjoyed excursions to Yellowstone and the Rocky Mountains, capturing nature with pencil and paper.

</p> <p>In 1904, Pauline was reunited with her love interest, Frank Hamilton, a newspaper writer by profession. Frank was serving time at Minnesota's Stillwater State Prison after a conviction for manslaughter. They were married on November 13, 1905, but it was to be a short marriage. Since being diagnosed with tuberculosis as a youth, Frank's health was a constant concern. The following year, in 1906, he passed away. In two more years, providing distance from yet another tragedy, she pursued her art aspirations in Vienna, Austria.
</p> <p>At Pauline's funeral, the agents observed the attire and features of the ten attendees, attempting to discern the nationality of each. He appears to be Austrian, and the other, is he Australian? That man is wearing a uniform, but the collar has no insignia. Where do we go from here? Fade to music.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/Pauline_Kruger.jpg" /><br /><br /> </center><br /> <center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center><br /> <br /> <p>Do you have a story of historical interest pertaining to the zither that you would like to share? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form. </p> </div> Tue, 29 Apr 2014 18:50:57 +0000 davidkyger 70 at http://zither.us On the Zither http://zither.us/on.the.zither <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">On the Zither</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-12-06T21:06:00+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 12/06/2013 - 21:06</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>This article, by Dr. Gerlinde Haid, comes from the Austrian publication Volkskunst heute (Folk Art Today),<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad1" href="#ftnad1" id="ftn.ad1">i</a>]</sup> a beautifully illustrated magazine devoted to Austrian handcrafts, costumes, and customs. The article is translated by Dr. Jane Curtis, and illustrations reproduced, with the kind permission of the publisher, the Hilde Jasser Verlag- und Werbegesellschaft mbH, Vienna, Austria. Translator comments and additions are set off in brackets; some slight rearrangements of material have been made for greater clarity in the English version.</i><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/schlagzither.png" /><br /> </center><br /> <br /> <div style="float: left"><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/otz1.jpg" /><br /><center>Old Tirolean folk zithers in<br /> Mittenwald and Salzburg form. <p></p></center></div> <p>The reawakened interest in Stubenmusiki<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad2" href="#ftnad2" id="ftn.ad2">ii</a>]</sup> inspired by Tobi Reiser in the 30s has brought an old folk instrument to new honor: the zither. Many folk musicians used to wrinkle up their nose at the word "zither". “Zither” meant salon music and the daughters of the upper class and "folksiness", smacking insipidly of togetherness and dilettantism – all expressed in a mixture of Heurigen schmalz and "Abend am Traunsee"<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad3" href="#ftnad3" id="ftn.ad3">iii</a>]</sup>, made up of poor selections, very little artistry, and much romanticism. In reality there was more to it than that. Tobi Reiser was a genius at picking up what appeared usable to him. He integrated the zither into his Stubenmusik along with harp, Hackbrett<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad4" href="#ftnad4" id="ftn.ad4">iv</a>]</sup>, and bass fiddle. In this function the zither is again popular on the folk music scene, in a "second incarnation", as the folk music researcher Walter Wiora would say, meaning that this music is no longer heard in its original contexts of dancing, everyday usage, and social gatherings, but is now performed at the old homeland reunion, at Christmastime, at Easter, in the spring, at get-togethers of singers and musicians. Its original role in folk music was different, and here and there still is today, with all the regional peculiarities belonging to this type of music.<br /> </p><div style="float: right"><img hspace="10" src="files/otz2.jpg" /><br /><center>Dancing the Steirer, with zither music. <br />Drawing by C.B.Binzer. The zither <br />player holds the instrument on his knees. <p></p></center></div> <p>The "East Alpine mountain zither", to use the technical term, is one of our most typical folk instruments, because it was invented in the realm of folk music.<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad5" href="#ftnad5" id="ftn.ad5">v</a>]</sup>According to sources, it must have been developed during the 17th century. Its immediate ancestor is the "Scheitholt" ["log"], which Michael Praetorius mentioned in 1619 and described as a low-class instrument. The oldest zithers had drone strings like the hurdy-gurdy, were held on the knees, and were played tremolo style. They were called Kratzzither, Scherrzither, Zwecklzither,<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad6" href="#ftnad6" id="ftn.ad6">vi</a>]</sup> and Raffele, and were also widespread in Scandinavia, Denmark, and North Germany as the "Langleg" [the Norwegian langeleik] and "Hummel" [the Swedish hummele]. The Raffele is still known today in the South Tirol.<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad7" href="#ftnad7" id="ftn.ad7">vii</a>]</sup> Little is known about the first "Schlagzithern" [struck zithers], whose melody strings were struck with a thumb ring as is done today, while the accompaniment strings are pulled. We do know that until about 1830 zithers were diatonic and that their further development went hand in hand with the expansion of Alpine melody and polyphony. The practice favored in our "original country music", transposing the melodies by a fifth when they are being used to accompany dancing, corresponds to the arrangement of the strings in intervals of a fifth. The playing order of the frets (the scale begins not with the base tone but with the tone a fifth below it) corresponds to the predilection for the leadoff tone derived from this fifth:<br /><img src="files/otz3.jpg" /></p> <p>These very simple diatonic instruments have long since disappeared from use in folk music. All that remains is a number of preserved exemplars in our museums, each one unique, corresponding to the inventiveness and imagination of their builders.<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad8" href="#ftnad8" id="ftn.ad8">viii</a>]</sup> Two main types have developed from them: the Salzburg form, which later became the concert zither, and the Mittenwald form, which had no issue. And from those days we also have Peter Rosegger's<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad9" href="#ftnad9" id="ftn.ad9">ix</a>]</sup>delightful account of the dignity, significance, and individuality of the old folk instrument:<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad10" href="#ftnad10" id="ftn.ad10">x</a>]</sup></p> <p><i>        The harp of the Alpine folk song is the zither, but not that perfected modern zither on which wandering artists once in a while achieve an admirable virtuosity. Such an instrument would be beyond the reach of the ordinary farmer, if only because it would cost the entire year's pay of a hardworking fellow, to say nothing of the time and finger dexterity required to play the zither.</i></p> <p><i>        My father had three brothers; each played a self-made two-stringed zither, expressing their innermost life in quite tolerable style. This inner music life consisted of a half dozen Steirer dances, or as they called them "Altweltischer" ["old worldish dances"], which brought the rest of the group to their feet in short order. My father was far superior to them artistically, however: he had three strings on his zither and played not only these dances but also folk songs, Jodler, and all sorts of unusual tunes of which we couldn't make head or tail. And if we asked him what they were, he replied "Nothing". They were combinations of tones he had created himself, however his fingers fell onto the strings, forgotten as soon as they died away.</i></p> <p><i>        The ring which zither players wear on the right thumb was unknown to us. We just took a piece of fish bone and scratched busily away. The expression "Zithernschlagen"<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad11" href="#ftnad11" id="ftn.ad11">xi</a>]</sup> was thus fairly accurate. My father did not like it when they danced to the "Zitherschlagen", although the sharp shrill tones easily overrode the clumping of mountain boots. When we eventually heard a polished zither player, we did not know what kind of strange music it was, until my younger brother looked at the instrument and astonished us with the report that the thing looked like a zither but was much larger, waxed to the nth degree like the bailiff's boots, and strung with at least several dozen strings.</i></p> <p><i>        "Several dozen strings!" cried my father, "it can't be; it's no zither, it's something else."</i><br /> </p><center><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/otz4.jpg" /><center>Singers from the Styrian Alps, with violin, zither, and guitar. Copper etching from Vienna 1829</center></center><br /> <p>How did the simple "peasant zither" become an art instrument?<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad12" href="#ftnad12" id="ftn.ad12">xii</a>]</sup>The way was long and complicated, beginning when the "Alpenlanders" and their music were discovered by the educated classes. The Styrian Alpine Singers, seeking their living far from their homeland, traveled to many countries after about 1825, as did the Tirolean National Singers. [The pictures show the Styrians using violin, guitar, and zither, the Tiroleans with zithers and Hackbrett.] Folk singing groups from Vienna soon began to travel as well. Of special importance in making the zither known was Johann Petzmayer (1803-1884), from Zistersdorf in Lower Austria. He became so proficient on the zither that Duke Max in Bayern, father of the empress Elizabeth, took zither lessons from him and in 1838 gave him the rank of Kammervirtuoso. From then on the musically talented among the nobility of Bavaria, Austria, and other areas, played the zither. It spread in turn to the ordinary folk, returning to where it had originated.<br /> </p><center><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/otz5.jpg" /><center>The Vienna Biedermeier writer Alexander Baumann, who introduced the zither into Vienna high society, <br />here playing the zither in an Alpine pasture near Grundlsee. Lithograph by Eduard Swoboda, c.1850.</center></center><br /> <p>Hand in hand with popularization came many attempts to improve and perfect the zither, to broaden its capabilities, to create instruction materials, and to standardize the tuning. It became a chromatic concert instrument, highly stylized, with five melody strings and as many as thirty-seven accompaniment/bass strings; and individual virtuosos did great things with it. Equally noteworthy were the attempts to establish a standard instrument. Along with perfectly serious efforts in zither clubs and publications, many strange things appeared. There were instruments with patterns to slide under the strings, supposedly making it easier to play; there were some with buttons for playing accompaniment chords automatically;<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad13" href="#ftnad13" id="ftn.ad13">xiii</a>]</sup> and other experiments offending against true musicianship.<br /> </p><center><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/otz6.jpg" /><center> Tyrolean National Singers' Society</center></center><br /> <p>Zither-playing folk musicians participated in this process. The zither is for accompaniment. It accompanies dancing and singing, violin and flute; it accompanies the amateur in the mountain meadow and the milkmaid milking, if the story is true that cows give more milk when they hear the delicate tones of the zither. And I know a young zither player who twice a day stands at the highly modern milking machine in his cow barn, minus zither of course, but has a way of playing that evokes his cows and farming. I know an old zither player who told me what he had learned at his first zither lesson: two left-hand chords, "even" and "odd", and when he then stroked the strings with his right hand, as told by the teacher, out came his first "Steirer". I know a zither player with hands so large and broad that he could completely cover a small zither, but the delicacy with which he handles his instrument is incomparable.<br /> </p><center><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/otz7.jpg" /><center>Folk Scene at a Heuriger in Vienna about 1818. <br />After a pencil drawing by Josef Lanzedelly (1774-1832)</center></center><br /> <p>Folk music does not need theory or even necessarily written notation. What it needs is feeling, musical instinct, musical imagination; then every limitation will become a creative push. The zither is an incomplete instrument, that is its strength.<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad14" href="#ftnad14" id="ftn.ad14">xiv</a>]</sup><br /> </p><center><br /> <img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/otz8.jpg" /><br /><center>Title page from "Collection of Selected Mountain Songs"<br /> by Ulrich Halbreiter, Munich 1839, dedicated to Duke Max in Bavaria <p></p></center><br /> </center><br /> <br /> <p>Footnotes:</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad1" href="#ftn.ad1" id="ftnad1">i</a>]</sup>. [1986 No.2, pp14-17]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad2" href="#ftn.ad2" id="ftnad2">ii</a>]</sup>. [Stubenmusik (or -musi) is music played at home or in such friendly cozy places as the Bierstube, the Weinstube, and other places of good cheer.]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad3" href="#ftn.ad3" id="ftnad3">iii</a>]</sup>. [The old Vienna evergreens played in the Heurigen nestled among the vineyards of the Wienerwald, reinforced by the unforgettable Anton Karas film score for The Third Man, helped create the zither's reputation as just a schmalz instrument, as did the many old tyme pieces (like the venerable Ein Abend am Traunsee [An Evening on Lake Traun]). Played too often and overdone, this kind of music becomes as boring as any others; but as part of the full range of music possible on the zither it continues to please players and listeners, and fortunately it is not disappearing as the zither realizes its full potential in other classical and modern types of music.]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad4" href="#ftn.ad4" id="ftnad4">v</a>]</sup>. [Like the American hammer dulcimer]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad5" href="#ftn.ad5" id="ftnad5">vi</a>]</sup>. Author's note: Cf. Karl Magnus Klier, Volkstümliche Musikinstrumente in den Alpen. Kassel and Basel 1956, p.84-93, and Leopold Schmidt, Volksmusik. Salzburg, 1974, pp33-39 and illustrations 28-31.</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad6" href="#ftn.ad6" id="ftnad6">vii</a>]</sup>. [The Kratzzither ["scratch zither"] resembles the Appalachian dulcimer, which normally has two or three strings over frets (usually diatonic) and one or two unfretted strings strummed as drone accompaniment. It is played by sliding a small bar of metal or wood over the fretted strings with the left hand to set the melody while the right hand strokes all of the strings at once, forth and back, with a quill or plectrum. Josef Brandlmeier's Handbuch der Zither (Munich: Süddeutscher Verlag, 1963, page 22) has this to say about the Kratz-, Scher(r)-, Zweckl-, and Raffelzithers:</p> <p>        The Scher(r)zithers and the Zwecklzithers still extant a hundred years ago in the Allgäu and Vorarlberg respectively (Alemannic areas bordering on Old Bavaria and the Tirol) were also Kratzzithers, which have evidently survived longer on the edge of the area under Bajuwarian influence. The name Scherrzither derives from the word scheren [to shear], while the Zwecklzither is so-called from the Zweckl (=Holzstäbchen [little wooden bar]) used to play it. </p> <p>        Closely related to the Kratzzither as regards historical development is the ... Raffel, also called Raffele or Raffelzither.... The fingerboard of today's Raffelzither, with its five strings, corresponds exactly to that of the standard zither. It is played with a plectrum of wood or horn, rests on the player's knees, and is secured in its position by a pedal on a leather strap. The left hand sets tones as on the zither, while the right strokes with a plectrum as on the mandolin.]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad7" href="#ftn.ad7" id="ftnad7">vii</a>]</sup>. [The Raffelzither in its presentday more developed form can be purchased in some of the areas where it was once popular.]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftnad8" href="#ftn.ad8" id="ftnad8">viii</a>]</sup>. Author's note: Cf. Kurt Birsak, Notes to the Folk Instruments in the Salzburg Museum Carolino Augusteum, especially regarding the arrangement of frets on the Alpine zither. In Die Volksmusik im Lande Salzburg, Wien, 1979, pp199-217</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftn.ad9" href="#ftnad9" id="ftn.ad9">ix</a>]</sup>. [Peter Rosegger (1843-1918) was an Austrian folk poet. He came from a farm family in the Steiermark (Styria), had no formal schooling, and began his working life early as a tailor's apprentice. He soon went to seek his fortune in Graz, the nearest city of consequence, where he attended business college and got his first writing job on a local newspaper, the Tagespost. His first collection of poems, in dialect and entitled Zither und Hackbrett, was published in Graz in 1869. He later wrote several novels dealing with the unfavorable impact of urban life on rural, siding with the latter, and in 1876 founded the monthly folk magazine Heimgarten, continued by his son after 1910. His collected works, published 1913-1916, ran to forty volumes, with a second edition 1922-24.]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftn.ad10" href="#ftnad10" id="ftn.ad10">x</a>]</sup> Author's footnote: Peter Rosegger, Neue Waldgeschichten. Wilde Musikanten. Eighth edition, Wien, Pest, Leipzig, 1896, pp306-307.</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftn.ad11" href="#ftnad11" id="ftn.ad11">xi</a>]</sup>. ["Zither(n)schlagen", meaning literally "to strike the zither", is merely another way of saying "to play the zither", as one might say in English "strike the harp" or "strike up the band". As "schlagen" can also mean hit, beat, beat on, etc., the writer is playing on words to indicate that their technique was not very refined.]</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftn.ad12" href="#ftnad12" id="ftn.ad12">xii</a>]</sup>. Author's note: Cf.August V. Nikl, Die Zither. Ihre historische Entwicklung bis zur Gegenwart. Wien, 1927</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftn.ad13" href="#ftnad13" id="ftn.ad13">xiii</a>]</sup>. [Both of these were autoharps, or chord zithers. They still exist today and are in fact quite popular in such areas as the southern Appalachians. Other than being a neckless sounding box with strings, they have virtually nothing in common with the true zither. There is no fingerboard. They are held in the arms in a more or less vertical position. The upper strings are chromatic and are strummed with the right hand, all of them, harplike, to accompany singing or other instruments. The more developed versions have lower strings and bass strings, so placed as to allow tuning in chords, which are set to the desired key and are struck with the left hand, either directly or by means of typewriter-like keys. Other hybrid offshoots are seen occasionally, for example the Waldzither (forest zither) I encountered a few years ago in Wuppertal, Germany.] Styrian Alpine Singers with violin, zither, and guitar. Copper etching from Vienna 1829</p> <p><sup>[<a name="ftn.ad14" href="#ftnad14" id="ftn.ad14">xiv</a>]</sup>. [This is a worthy reminder not to forget the zither's folk origins. Once discovered by a few aristocrats, the zither went quickly from a folk instrument to a hobby of the upper classes. Although it came to be thought of as a schmalz instrument, as Dr.Haid has related, it developed technically, and the highly refined concert zither is now recognized as a "serious" instrument, its tonal range exceeded only by that of the piano, and the only instrument outside the keyboard family on which melody and full accompaniment can both be played on one instrument by one player. Just as the zither was revived among the common folk after its adoption by high society, so its folk side should be maintained now that it is accepted as a classical instrument.]</p> </div> Fri, 06 Dec 2013 21:06:00 +0000 davidkyger 129 at http://zither.us A Zither Match http://zither.us/zitherist.max.maier <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Zither Match</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-09-27T21:16:04+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 09/27/2013 - 21:16</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>In the late 1870s, zither players in the US began forming clubs to share music with the public. It was during this period that a Bavarian from Ruhpolding, Max Maier, settled in San Francisco and became established as a leading proponent of the zither. At his studio, Max gave music lessons, sold zithers and provided all the requisites for zither players in his community.</i><br /> </p><center><img src="files/fslogo.png" /></center> <p>Music has its way of bringing people together. There is the common bond of taste and interest, and sometimes there is romance.</p> <div style="float: right"><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/maier-a.jpg" /><i></i><center>Max Maier and Mary Peace, 1887</center></div> <p>In San Francisco, in the late 1800s, a woman was accompanied by her mother to visit a zither teacher at his studio. The zither had its charm for the prospective student, but apparently so did the instructor. After leaving, the young woman turned to her mother and professed, "That's the man I want to marry." The zither teacher later revealed that he too watched the pair leave through his window and, thinking of his new student, dreamed, "That's the girl I want to marry."</p> <p>And so, on February 8, 1887, Mary Hannah Peace and Max Maier were joined together in marriage at St. Paul's Lutheran Church. By 1893, the family had grown by three, with the births of Lydia, Elsie and Herbert. Mary's mother also lived with the family and with the additional income provided by her dressmaking business, the Maier family lived comfortably.</p> <p>Max Maier was born to a large Catholic family in Ruhpolding, Bavaria, on August 25, 1849, the 19th of 21 children. Max arrived in San Francisco via a circuitous route. As a teenager he apprenticed at a pastry shop, but abandoned this profession for adventure. At 17, he left his village, zither in tow, living for years in Russia, Italy and France where he earned his living giving music lessons. </p> <p>In 1877, after his travels in Europe, Max settled in San Francisco and established a zither studio. At his business he sold his zither arrangements and compositions, including all the requisites for zither players in his community. For over four decades he directed a zither club, which assumed different names over the years. Formed in the 1890s as the Columbia Zither Club, it was later known as the San Francisco Zither Club until 1926, when it became the Alpine Zither Club. Through this period, Max's zither clubs gave dozens of concerts at public venues in the city.</p> <div style="float: left"><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/maier-b.jpg" /><i></i><center>Max and Mary in their garden, <p> Oakland, ca. 1924</p></center></div> <p>No one could have predicted the dramatic events that unfolded on the morning of April 18, 1906. The earthquake proved devastating for the Maier family, as it did for so many of the city's inhabitants. In the multitude of fires that followed, many caused by gas main breaks or exasperated by ineffectual containment efforts, Max's zither enterprise was wiped out, as zithers, manuscripts and other precious documents were lost to the flames. Also lost were letters to Max Maier from Queen Lili'uokalani, the last monarch of Hawaii. Lili'uokalani played many instruments, but it was said that the zither was her favorite. The two started a correspondence after she had ordered zither strings from him, and this exchange lasted for years.</p> <p>In the days that followed their terrible loss, the Maier family was counted among the city's new refugees. Living in Golden Gate Park, they found relief through support provided by the American Red Cross. Fortunately, the bank where the family kept a significant savings account was not destroyed and they were able to purchase a home in East Oakland. They set about to rebuild their lives at 904 E. 11th St.</p> <p>Slowly things returned to normal, as family and friends were reunited. Zither students returned and Max gave lessons in the front parlor of their home, while the dining room was used for working out zither arrangements. "Teddy," the family's canary, sang along as Max played.</p> <p>A treasured part of home life was the family garden. There was a fig tree, and an almond that emitted a wonderful aroma when in bloom. Mary tended her flowers and would draw upon chives, parsley, rosemary and other numerous herbs for her cooking. In the garden were two summer houses, built by Max, equipped with seats and tables for the comfort and enjoyment of family and guests. </p> <p>Mary is remembered for her cheer and hospitality, as she hosted numerous "Kaffe Klatches" at their home in East Oakland. Max enjoyed humor with friends and the occasional prank, as when he tied a variety of grape clusters to his own vines, leaving his guests deeply impressed with his mastery of the horticultural arts. Or, he would lead into a story from his youth in Bavaria, usually introducing the tale with, "In meiner Heimat…."<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/san-francisco-zither-club.jpg" /> <p>San Francisco Zither Club, circa 1912<br /> <br /><br /> </p></center> <p>The following tables provide examples of Max Maier's public performances and sheet music.<br /> </p><center>Max Maier Zither Programs</center> <table border="1"> <tr> <td><b>Index</b></td> <td><b>Program</b></td> <td><b>Date</b></td> <td><b>Notes</b></td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0019.pdf">MP-0019</a></td> <td>First Concert of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, January 14, 1894</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0020.pdf">MP-0020</a></td> <td>35th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, October 20th, 1912</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0021.pdf">MP-0021</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Seventh Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 11, 1926</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0022.pdf">MP-0022</a></td> <td>First Anniversary Concert of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, August 19th, 1894</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0023.pdf">MP-0023</a></td> <td>Third Concert of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 28th, 1895</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0024.pdf">MP-0024</a></td> <td>Fourth Concert and Social of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>Thursday Evening, Nov. 19th, 1895</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0025.pdf">MP-0025</a></td> <td>Ninth Concert of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>On Sunday Evening, April 30, 1899</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0026.pdf">MP-0026</a></td> <td>Tenth Concert and Social of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>On Thursday Evening, November 30, 1899 (Thanksgiving Day)</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0027.pdf">MP-0027</a></td> <td>Eleventh Concert and Social of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>On Sunday Evening, March 25, 1900</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0028.pdf">MP-0028</a></td> <td>Twelfth Concert and Social of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>On Thursday Evening, November 29, 1900 (Thanksgiving Day)</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0029.pdf">MP-0029</a></td> <td>Fourteenth Concert and Social of the Columbia Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 21, 1901</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0030.pdf">MP-0030</a></td> <td>Sixteenth Concert and Social of The San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, March 15, 1903</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0031.pdf">MP-0031</a></td> <td>Seventeenth Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Thursday Evening, November 26, 1903</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0032.pdf">MP-0032</a></td> <td>Eighteenth Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 17, 1904</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0033.pdf">MP-0033</a></td> <td>Nineteenth Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Eve., October 23rd, 1904</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0034.pdf">MP-0034</a></td> <td>Twenty-First Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, October 22nd, 1905</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0035.pdf">MP-0035</a></td> <td>Twenty-Second Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 15th, 1906</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0036.pdf">MP-0036</a></td> <td>Twenty-Third Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Thursday Eve. (Thanksgiving Day) November 29th, 1906</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0037.pdf">MP-0037</a></td> <td>Twenty-Fourth Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 28th, 1907</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0038.pdf">MP-0038</a></td> <td>Twenty-Fifth Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, November 10, 1907</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0039.pdf">MP-0039</a></td> <td>26th Semi-Annual Concert of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, April 12, 1908</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0040.pdf">MP-0040</a></td> <td>27th Semi-Annual Concert of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, November 8, 1908</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0041.pdf">MP-0041</a></td> <td>28th Semi-Annual Concert of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Eve., April 25th</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0042.pdf">MP-0042</a></td> <td>29th Semi-Annual Concert of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, Oct. 31st, 1909</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0043.pdf">MP-0043</a></td> <td>30th Semi-Annual Concert of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 24, 1910</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0044.pdf">MP-0044</a></td> <td>31st Semi-Annual Concert of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, November 20, 1910</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0045.pdf">MP-0045</a></td> <td>32nd Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 30, 1911</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0046.pdf">MP-0046</a></td> <td>33rd Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Thursday, (Thanksgiving night) November 30th, 1911</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0047.pdf">MP-0047</a></td> <td>34th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, April 28, 1912</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0048.pdf">MP-0048</a></td> <td>Thirty-Sixth Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, December 8, 1912</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0049.pdf">MP-0049</a></td> <td>37th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, April 20th, 1913</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0050.pdf">MP-0050</a></td> <td>38th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday, November 23, 1913</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0051.pdf">MP-0051</a></td> <td>39th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, May 10, 1914</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0052.pdf">MP-0052</a></td> <td>40th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, November 29th, 1914</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0053.pdf">MP-0053</a></td> <td>41st Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday evening, May 9th, 1915</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0054.pdf">MP-0054</a></td> <td>42nd Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, October 31, 1915</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0055.pdf">MP-0055</a></td> <td>43rd Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Sunday Evening, May 14, 1916</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0056.pdf">MP-0056</a></td> <td>44th Semi-Annual Concert and Social of the San Francisco Zither Club</td> <td>Saturday Evening, November 25, 1916</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0057.pdf">MP-0057</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Second Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 29th, 1923</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0058.pdf">MP-0058</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Third Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, November 4, 1923</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0059.pdf">MP-0059</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Fourth Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, October 12, 1924</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0060.pdf">MP-0060</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Fifth Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, May 3, 1925</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0061.pdf">MP-0061</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Sixth Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, Nov. 1, 1925</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0062.pdf">MP-0062</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Seventh Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday Evening, April 11, 1926</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/mp0063.pdf">MP-0063</a></td> <td>The Alpine Zither Club, Eighth Concert and Ball</td> <td>Sunday evening, November 7, 1926</td> <td>Code: C / Compliments of Barbara Cheatham and Phyllis Zagone</td> </tr> </table> <p></p><center>Max Maier Zither Arrangements</center> <table border="1"> <tr> <td><b>Index</b></td> <td><b>Composer</b></td> <td><b>Arranger</b></td> <td><b>Title</b></td> <td><b>Publisher</b></td> <td><b>Notes</b></td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0063.pdf">SM-0063</a></td> <td>Traditional</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Pastime for Zither Players</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: C</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0329.pdf">SM-0329</a></td> <td>L. von der Mehden</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Lindenau, Polka</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0330.pdf">SM-0330</a></td> <td>A. Pierce / Traditional</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Happy Youth Galop / Comin' thro' the Rye</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0331.pdf">SM-0331</a></td> <td>Crough / Thompson</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Kathleen Mavourneen / Clara Schottische</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0332.pdf">SM-0332</a></td> <td>Faust</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Sharpshooter's March (Schützen Marsch)</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> </table> <p></p><center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p>Thank you to Phyllis Maier Zagone, Barbara Maier Cheatham, granddaughters of Max and Mary Maier, and to Conni Plath Reid, great-granddaughter, without whom this article would not have been possible. Elements of this story were drawn from the Maier-Peace family history written by Elsie Weiss Plath, granddaughter, in 1988. </p> <p>Do you have a story of historical interest pertaining to the zither that you would like to share? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form. </p> </div> Fri, 27 Sep 2013 21:16:04 +0000 davidkyger 127 at http://zither.us The Concert Zither in America's Civil War http://zither.us/concert.zither.civil.war <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The Concert Zither in America&#039;s Civil War</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-08-31T23:50:21+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 08/31/2013 - 23:50</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>John Maurath identified a photograph that should be of great interest to zither players. The photograph clearly shows a Union soldier, more than likely a soldier of German heritage, playing a concert zither. Although the picture speaks for itself, the question remains: What did he play?</i><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/luftzither.png" /><br /> </center> <p>Several years into the Civil War, the Union Army began forming regiments of freed slaves, thereby enabling these men to engage directly in the struggle for freedom and equality. One such regiment that served with honor and distinction was the 4th United States Colored Troops (USCT), formed in Baltimore, Maryland in 1863.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/4thUSCT1.jpg" /><br /> <i>Officers and enlisted men of the 4th United States Colored Troops</i><br /> </center> <p>Units such as the the 4th USCT consisted of freed slaves serving as enlisted men, while whites were commissioned as officers to command the regiments. Many of the officers who served within these units were recent immigrants from Germany, many of whom enlisted to serve the cause of the Union. There were also some Germans (and some blacks, ironically) who fought for the South.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/4thUSCT2.jpg" /><br /> <i>Guitar and Zither Player in the Union Army</i><br /> </center> <p>The photograph provided above with officers and enlisted men of the 4th USCT is particularly interesting for zither players. The soldier, accompanied by a soldier with a guitar, has a zither on his lap. The zither player's right-hand pinky is resting on the bridge of the instrument, a hand position reflective of the playing style of the period. He also appears to be clearly enjoying himself as can be seen by the wine bottle and goblet conveniently placed just to his left.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/4thinfantry4.jpg" /><br /> <i>Captain John J. Eberhardt</i> <p> </p></center> <p>The soldier playing the zither is captain of Company D, as signified by the rank on his shoulder boards and the prominent "D" on his cap. Civil War records preserved by the National Archives and Records Administration identify John J. Eberhardt as the commander of this company and provide insight into his service with this unit.</p> <p>John J. Eberhardt joined for duty in Baltimore, MD, on September 7, 1863 for a period of 3 years. Six days later, on September 13, he was assigned to command Company D of the 4th USCT. In August, 1864, he was a patient at the officers' hospital on Bedloe's Island, New York, where he received treatment for Typhoid fever. While a patient in New York, he requested a twenty days leave of absence to return to his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, to continue his recovery. He mustered out of the Army in Washington, DC, on May 4, 1886, and received travel pay to return to his home in Cincinnati. </p> <p>Although it is clearly apparent Captain Eberhardt is playing a zither, we're not aware of specific songs performed on the zither by soldiers in America's Civil War. Clues exist, however, in the form of letters written by Germans to friends and family members in Germany during the course of the war. This excerpt, from <sup>[<a name="ftn.ad1" href="#ftnad1" id="ftn.ad1">1</a>]</sup><u> Germans in the Civil War: The Letters They Wrote Home</u>, was written by Captain August Horstmann, originally from Schweiburg, Germany.<br /> </p><dl>"Long before the battle was supposed to begin and without having any reserves behind him, this officer gave his regiment the command to attack (rumor has it he was drunk and he now faces court-martial). They beat back the enemy pickets, and then they started singing "Hinaus in die Ferne" [ a German hiking song ] etc. and went straight into a bayonet attack..."</dl><br /> <center><br /> <img src="files/hidf.png" /><br /> </center> <p>Captain Horstmann, in his reference to <sup>[<a name="ftn.ad2" href="#ftnad2" id="ftn.ad2">2</a>]</sup> "Hinaus in die Ferne", does not mention the zither specifically. However, this is a documented reference to a song that was known by Germans fighting in America's Civil War. As such, it is highly probable that this song would have been performed on the zither by German Civil War soldiers.</p> <p>Additional references to the zither being played by Civil War soldiers during periods of leisure exist. The 20th New York Infantry, known as the <sup>[<a name="ftn.ad3" href="#ftnad3" id="ftn.ad3">3</a>]</sup>"Turner Rifles," as its soldiers were drawn from the New York Turn Verein, provided zither music on the occasion of an inspection by General Benjamin Butler.<br /> </p><dl>"When General Benjamin Butler inspected the 20th New York Infantry in July 1861, the Turners performed physical exercises for the general and his family before delighting them with fine musical pieces. As Butler recalled, 'The melting tones of the zither rang through the air, and in the course of the evening a concert of German music entertained the guests.'"</dl> <p>Aside from the documented instances of soldiers performing on the zither, additional insight is provided by public performances in the same period. In May, 1863, a Professor Turner provided musical entertainment to the residents of Hartford, Connecticut. Professor Turner's zither performance<sup>[<a name="ftn.ad4" href="#ftnad4" id="ftn.ad4">4</a>]</sup> included Operatic selections from "Martha," "Lucia," "Ernani" and "Norma," renditions of "National Melody" and "Battle March", with "Schubert's Serenade" identified as the evening's favorite.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p> <sup>[<a name="ftnad1" href="#ftn.ad1" id="ftnad1">1</a>]</sup>Kamphoefner, Walter D., and Wolfgang Helbich, eds. <u>Germans in the Civil War: The Letters They Wrote Home.</u> Trans. Susan Carter Vogel. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2006<br /> <sup>[<a name="ftnad2" href="#ftn.ad2" id="ftnad2">2</a>]</sup>Feurzeig, Lisa, ed. <u>Deutsche Lieder für Jung und Alt.</u> Middleton: A-R Editions, Inc. 2002<br /> <sup>[<a name="ftnad3" href="#ftn.ad3" id="ftnad3">3</a>]</sup>Öfele, Martin W., <u>True Sons of the Republic: European Immigrants in the Union Army.</u> Frederick A. Praeger, 2008<br /> <sup>[<a name="ftnad4" href="#ftn.ad4" id="ftnad4">4</a>]</sup>"Zither Concert", Hartford Daily Courant, May 16, 1862</p> <p><i>John Maurath, whose research originally brought this photograph to light, is a Missouri Civil War buff, researcher and zither enthusiast. John's great-grandfather, born during the Civil War, was a zither player, and the zither was in the family until recently. John currently works for the <a href="http://www.missouricivilwarmuseum.org">Missouri Civil War Museum</a> at Historic Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis, MO and is interested in publishing a Civil War Music CD that features the zither. Should this project bear fruit, it will undoubtedly be of great interest to both Civil War historians and zither players alike.</i></p> <p>Do you have information of historical interest pertaining to the zither that you would like to share? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</p> </div> Sat, 31 Aug 2013 23:50:21 +0000 davidkyger 13 at http://zither.us Franz Schwarzer and Friends http://zither.us/node/126 <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Franz Schwarzer and Friends</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-08-12T03:16:23+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/12/2013 - 03:16</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>This circa 1901 photo comes to us courtesy of the State Historical Society of Missouri. Shown standing on the right is Franz Schwarzer, Missouri's famous zither maker. At his factory in Washington, Missouri, over 10,000 instruments were manufactured, the majority of which were zithers. Also identified in the photo are Mr. Muehl, seated with zither, and Mr. Schmidt, shown holding a book.</i><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/franzschwarzer-1901.jpg" /> <p>Mr. Schmidt, Mr. Muehl and Franz Schwarzer. Courtesy State Historical Society of Missouri.<br /> </p></center> <!--break--><p><br /><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p>Do you have a zither photograph of historical interest that you would like to share with the community? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</p> </div> Mon, 12 Aug 2013 03:16:23 +0000 davidkyger 126 at http://zither.us Charles Schroeter Collection http://zither.us/charles.schroeter.collection <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Charles Schroeter Collection</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-06-30T23:16:05+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 06/30/2013 - 23:16</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>A very generous donation of early zither sheet music was recently received by Zither US, compliments of Jerry Turnbaugh. A significant portion of this music, donated in memory of his friend, Charles Schroeter, has now been digitized and is posted here for the enjoyment of the zither community. As an introduction to the collection, Jerry has provided the following remembrance...</i><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/cs_header.jpg" /><br /> </center> <p>Charles Schroeter, Charlie as we knew him, was a close friend and co-worker of my sister, Jean Turnbaugh Hodson, a professor at the University of Washington. Through Jean, Charlie became one of our family and shared his zither talent with us on many occasions.</p> <div style="float: right"><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/charles_schroeter.jpg" /><i></i><center>Charles Schroeter, September, 1958</center></div> <p>Charlie was born in London in 1900 and educated in Belgium, Switzerland and Germany. He emigrated to Canada in 1926 and subsequently to Seattle, Washington in 1950. As Charlie tells it, his first contact with the zither was when his uncle gave him a zither and taught him the rudiments when he was 11 years old. He received professional instruction from Franz Degen for about two years and then for another three years from Miss Frieda Meier. He became interested in the piano and took two years of piano lessons.</p> <p>In Canada, he met Paul Heinrich from whom he ultimately purchased a Meinel Perfecta zither. The zither was Mr. Heinrich's pride and joy and Charlie learned to appreciate it while playing duets with Mr. Heinrich in 1939 and 1940. Mr. Heinrich died in 1943 and Charlie was able to buy the zither from the Heinrich family on Christmas, 1953.</p> <p>Charlie couldn't find anyone in Seattle with whom to play, so he and Jean bought two reel-to-reel recorders and Charlie would record first zither on one recorder and then play second zither while recording both on the second recorder. Crude technology but they had fun with the process and it was a delight for the rest of us.</p> <p>Charlie passed away in 1966 at age 66. We missed him.<br /> <br /></p> <p>Jerry Turnbaugh</p> <p>June, 2013<br /> <br /><br /> </p><center><b>Zither Music, The Charles Schroeter Collection</b></center> <table border="1"> <td><b>Index</b></td> <td><b>Composer</b></td> <td><b>Arranger</b></td> <td><b>Title</b></td> <td><b>Publisher</b></td> <td><b>Notes</b></td> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0325.pdf">SM-0325</a></td> <td>Christoph Voigt</td> <td>Christoph Voigt</td> <td>In die weite Welt, Marsch</td> <td>Christoph Voigt, Dreseden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Zitherlehrer Max Götze in Radeberg freundlichst gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0326.pdf">SM-0326</a></td> <td>Josef Hauser</td> <td>Josef Hauser</td> <td>Für d' Loni, Schuhplatt'l-Walzer</td> <td>Josef Hauser, München</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer, Washington, Mo./ Voices: Zither I, Zither II, Guitar</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0327.pdf">SM-0327</a></td> <td>Henry Vries</td> <td>Henry Vries</td> <td>D' Almaleab'n, Fantasie im Ländlerstyl</td> <td>Henry Vries, Köln</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Seinem lieben Freunde Peter Weyand gewidment</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0328.pdf">SM-0328</a></td> <td>C. G. Burda</td> <td>C. G. Burda</td> <td>Einzug des Königs Wein, Triumphmarsch</td> <td>Mannheim, K. Ferd Heckel</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Der Schuch'schen Zither-Schule in Frankfurt a/M achtungsvoll gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0329.pdf">SM-0329</a></td> <td>L. von der Mehden</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Lindenau, Polka</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0330.pdf">SM-0330</a></td> <td>A. Pierce / Traditional</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Happy Youth Galop / Comin' thro' the Rye</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0331.pdf">SM-0331</a></td> <td>Crough / Thompson</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Kathleen Mavourneen / Clara Schottische</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0332.pdf">SM-0332</a></td> <td>Faust</td> <td>Max Maier</td> <td>Sharpshooter's March (Schützen Marsch)</td> <td>Max Maier, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0333.pdf">SM-0333</a></td> <td>Volkslied</td> <td>Paul Heinrich</td> <td>Kde Domov Muj</td> <td>A. W. Rost, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0334.pdf">SM-0334</a></td> <td>Carl Sackur</td> <td>Felix Lohr</td> <td>Glöcken im Thale, Gavotte</td> <td>Carl Sackur, Breslau</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0335.pdf">SM-0335</a></td> <td>Josef Hauser</td> <td>Josef Hauser</td> <td>Die Zithermeisterin, Concert-Polka</td> <td>Josef Hauser, Erding</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer Zither Co., Washington, Mo. / Voices: Zither I, Zither II</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0336.pdf">SM-0336</a></td> <td>Franz v. Suppé / Th. Koschat</td> <td>Max Albert / R. Hose</td> <td>Two Airs from "Boccaccio" / Verlassen Bin I / Schnadahüpf'l</td> <td>Nord-Amerikan Zither Journal, New York</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0337.pdf">SM-0337</a></td> <td>Alois Bauer</td> <td>Alois Bauer</td> <td>Herzblümchen, Polka</td> <td>Eigenthum des Componisten</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0338.pdf">SM-0338</a></td> <td>Jos. Kellner</td> <td>Jos. Kellner</td> <td>Ungarischer Nationaltanz</td> <td>J. Kellner's Selbstverlag, München</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0339.pdf">SM-0339</a></td> <td>L. Gruber</td> <td>L. Gruber</td> <td>Vor ihra Hütt'n</td> <td>J. G. Seeling, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0340.pdf">SM-0340</a></td> <td>Volkslied (Gedicht von Rückert</td> <td>M. Abt</td> <td>Aus der Jugendzeit</td> <td>Domkowsky &amp; Co., Hamburg</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0341.pdf">SM-0341</a></td> <td>Bernhard Siefert</td> <td>Bernhard Siefert</td> <td>Die Liebesboten</td> <td>Carl Steiner, Berlin</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Hermann Stark in St. Louis freundschaftlichst gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0342.pdf">SM-0342</a></td> <td>Ferdinand Kollmaneck</td> <td>Ferdinand Kollmaneck</td> <td>Glücksträume</td> <td>Hans Ziegler, München</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0343.pdf">SM-0343</a></td> <td>Jos. Bill</td> <td>Jos. Bill</td> <td>O mei Waberl, Polka</td> <td>Tölz, Echo vom Gebirge</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: Henry Wormsbacher, Music Publisher, 1988 East 59th Str., Cleveland, O.</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0344.pdf">SM-0344</a></td> <td>Josef Hauser</td> <td>Josef Hauser</td> <td>Frühlings-Einzug, Gavotte</td> <td>Jos. Hauser, München</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0345.pdf">SM-0345</a></td> <td>F. X. Wallner</td> <td>F. X. Wallner</td> <td>Im Trauten Heim, Tyrolienne</td> <td>Zentralblatt Deutscher Zithervereine</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0346.pdf">SM-0346</a></td> <td>Wiilh. Tafelmeyer</td> <td>Wiilh. Tafelmeyer</td> <td>Erinnerung an Eidelstedt, Ländlicher Tanz</td> <td>Zentralblatt Deutscher Zithervereine</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Meinen Eidelstedter Freunden zum Andenken</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0347.pdf">SM-0347</a></td> <td>Stefan Köhler</td> <td>Stefan Köhler</td> <td>Rollerscher Stenographen Galopp</td> <td>Zentralblatt Deutscher Zithervereine</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Albert Schulze in Freundschaft gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0348.pdf">SM-0348</a></td> <td>Max Albert</td> <td>Max Albert</td> <td>Das Salzburger Glockenspiel</td> <td>Berlin, M. Bahn</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer Zither Co., Washington, Mo.</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0349.pdf">SM-0349</a></td> <td>Paul Rudiger</td> <td>Paul Rudiger</td> <td>Glocken=Harfen=und Violoncellfantasie à la Burgstaller</td> <td>A. Kabatek, Leipzig</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Seinem Freunde Herrn A. Maurer gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0350.pdf">SM-0350</a></td> <td>Ed. Hoenes</td> <td>Ed. Hoenes</td> <td>'s Fensterl'n, Alpen-Idylle</td> <td>Trier, bei P. Ed. Hoenes</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Voices: Zither I, Zither II</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0351.pdf">SM-0351</a></td> <td>Franz Degen</td> <td>Franz Degen</td> <td>Graf Zeppelin Gavotte</td> <td>Franz Degen, Zürich</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Sr. Excellenz Graf F. v. Zeppelin hochachtungsvollst gewidmet / Voices: Zither I, Streichzither</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0352.pdf">SM-0352</a></td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Ein Traumbild, Ländler über ein Motiv von Lumbye</td> <td>Altona, bei dem Herausgeber</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: Herman C. Grohe, Washington, Mo.</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0353.pdf">SM-0353</a></td> <td>F. von Blon</td> <td>Geo. Lechler</td> <td>Buren Marsch</td> <td>Theodor Lohr, New York</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0354.pdf">SM-0354</a></td> <td>Josef Gschwandner</td> <td>Josef Gschwandner</td> <td>Sounds from the Pacific Ocean, Waltzes</td> <td>M. Gray, San Francisco</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0355.pdf">SM-0355</a></td> <td>L. Freytag</td> <td>L. Freytag</td> <td>Irrlichtlein</td> <td>P. Ed. Hoenes in Trier</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Herrn Georg Fodermayer aus Verehrung und Dankbarkeit gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0356.pdf">SM-0356</a></td> <td>Rudolf Förster</td> <td>Alf. Fabian</td> <td>Gukurru, Pola-Mazurka</td> <td>C. Sackur, Breslau</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0357.pdf">SM-0357</a></td> <td>Leopold Gruber</td> <td>Leopold Gruber</td> <td>Holde Träumerin, Polka-Mazur.</td> <td>Mannheim, K. Ferd Heckel</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0358.pdf">SM-0358</a></td> <td>Edwin Schiffel</td> <td>Edwin Schiffel</td> <td>Inspiration, Tonbild</td> <td>Robert Söhnel, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Zithervirtuos Paul Renk in Leipzig freundschaftlichst gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0359.pdf">SM-0359</a></td> <td>Edwin Schiffel</td> <td>Edwin Schiffel</td> <td>Illusionen, Fantasiestück</td> <td>Robert Söhnel, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Henry Wormsbacher in Jersey-City N.A. freundschaftlichst gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0360.pdf">SM-0360</a></td> <td>Max Albert</td> <td>Max Albert</td> <td>La Malinconia, Thema zur Fantasie über eine Romanze von Fabio Campana</td> <td>A. Kabatek, Leipzig</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0361.pdf">SM-0361</a></td> <td>Max Albert</td> <td>Max Albert</td> <td>Drei Lieder (Bitte / An die Melancholie / Wohl waren es Tage der Sonne)</td> <td>A. Kabatek, Leipzig</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer, Washington, Mo.</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0362.pdf">SM-0362</a></td> <td>Banks Winter</td> <td>Paul Heinrich</td> <td>Heimwärts, Amerikanischer Walzer</td> <td>A. W. Rost, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0363.pdf">SM-0363</a></td> <td>Theodor Kehl</td> <td>Theodor Kehl</td> <td>a , „Grüsse aus'm Bayerland“, Ländler</td> <td>Christ. Ludw. Steffen, Stettin</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Alexander Deprosse in Liverpool freundschaftlichst dedicirt</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0364.pdf">SM-0364</a></td> <td>Franz Schubert / J. P. Webster</td> <td>Franz von P. Ott</td> <td>The Lady of the Lake, Ellen's First Song / Sweet By and By</td> <td>A. M. J. Mueller, Philadelphia, PA</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Arranged for the Zither and dedicated to Hubert von Herkomer, Arranged for the Zither and dedicated to Miss Katie Haack, Minneapolis, Minn. / On cover: Compliments of Albert A. Hesse, Washington, Mo. - U.S.A</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0365.pdf">SM-0365</a></td> <td>J. Allfeld</td> <td>J. Allfeld</td> <td>Fürstenberg-Marsch</td> <td>Bremen, A. E. Fischer</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer, Washington, Mo. / Dedication: Seiner Hochfürstlichen Durchlaucht dem Fürsten Carl Egon zu Fürstenberg in tiefster Ehrfurcht gewidmet / Voices: Zither I, Zither II</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0366.pdf">SM-0366</a></td> <td>Jos. Swoboda</td> <td>Jos. Swoboda</td> <td>Am Waldesrand</td> <td>Robert Wächtler, Hamburg</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Voices: Zither, Piano</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0367.pdf">SM-0367</a></td> <td>C. F. Enslein</td> <td>C. F. Enslein</td> <td>Alpenveilchen, Polka-Mazur</td> <td>Eigenthum des Componisten</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Ihrer Wohlgeboren der Frau Josefine Lenneis geb. Tschurtschenthaler hochachtungsvoll gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0368.pdf">SM-0368</a></td> <td>W. O. Mickenschreiber</td> <td>W. O. Mickenschreiber</td> <td>„Scherzo“, Polatanz-Form</td> <td>Georg Hentzschel, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Herrn Wilh. Göbel, Essen, in Freundschaft zugeeignet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0369.pdf">SM-0369</a></td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Gemüths-Klänge, Ländler</td> <td>Wein, bei dem Herausgeber</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0370.pdf">SM-0370</a></td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Zwei Lieder ohne Worte (Allein, Thränen)</td> <td>Wein, bei dem Herausgeber</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0371.pdf">SM-0371</a></td> <td>Bernhard Seifert</td> <td>Bernhard Seifert</td> <td>Im Fichtenhain, Tonstück</td> <td>Moabiter Zither-Akademie, Berlin</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0372.pdf">SM-0372</a></td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>„Bunte Reihe", Potpourri</td> <td>Altona, Hercules Hinz</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0373.pdf">SM-0373</a></td> <td>Chr. Ludw. Steffen</td> <td>Chr. Ludw. Steffen</td> <td>Herzens Frühling, Fantasie brillante</td> <td>Christ. Ludw. Steffen, Stettin</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Fräulein Clara Steffen gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0374.pdf">SM-0374</a></td> <td>Bernhard Seifert</td> <td>Bernhard Seifert</td> <td>Aus'm Isergebirg, Ländler</td> <td>Georg Hentzschel, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Seinem talentvollen Schüler, Herrn Heinz Schreiber Berlin gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0375.pdf">SM-0375</a></td> <td>Ferd. Kollmaneck</td> <td>Ferd. Kollmaneck</td> <td>Waldeszauber, Walzer</td> <td>Hans Ziegler, München</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0376.pdf">SM-0376</a></td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Waldesrauschen, Reverie</td> <td>A. Kabatek, Leipzig</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0377.pdf">SM-0377</a></td> <td>F. Möller</td> <td>F. Möller</td> <td>Lustfahrten, Walzer</td> <td>Friedrich Ahrens, Hamburg-Altona</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer, Washington, Mo.</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0378.pdf">SM-0378</a></td> <td>Ferdinand Kollmaneck</td> <td>Ferdinand Kollmaneck</td> <td>Sonate in B Dur</td> <td>Cgr. Voigt, Dresden</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Seiner Wohlgeboren Herrn Carl Sloup gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0379.pdf">SM-0379</a></td> <td>J. Kellner</td> <td>J. Kellner</td> <td>Fischer Lust</td> <td>J. Kellner's Selbst-Verlag, München</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0380.pdf">SM-0380</a></td> <td>Joseph Rixner</td> <td>Joseph Rixner</td> <td>„Auf steilen Felsen-Höhen“, Walzer</td> <td>P. Ed. Hoenes in Trier</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0381.pdf">SM-0381</a></td> <td>Hans Thauer</td> <td>Hans Thauer</td> <td>Verlangen und Entsagen, Tönstück</td> <td>Fr. Klare jr., Klein-Holthausen b/ Brünninghausen</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Voices: Zither I, Flöte, Streichzither I oder Violine I</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0382.pdf">SM-0382</a></td> <td>Franz Wagner</td> <td>Franz Wagner</td> <td>Zwei Lieder ohne Worte (Alpenrose, Am Grundlsee)</td> <td>Franz Wagner, Wien</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0383.pdf">SM-0383</a></td> <td>John Philip Sousa</td> <td>Jos. A. Koch</td> <td>The Stars and Stripes Forever, March</td> <td>The John Church Company, US</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0384.pdf">SM-0384</a></td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Herzenstelegramm</td> <td>Wein, bei dem Herausgeber</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0385.pdf">SM-0385</a></td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Carl J. F. Umlauf</td> <td>Errinnerung An Ems, Conzertstück</td> <td>Wein, bei dem Herausgeber</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0386.pdf">SM-0386</a></td> <td>Max Schulz</td> <td>Max Schulz</td> <td>Elisen-Gavotte</td> <td>Regensburg, B. Fritz</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Wohlgeb. Frl. Elise Siehe freundlichst gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0387.pdf">SM-0387</a></td> <td>Carl Fittig</td> <td>Carl Fittig</td> <td>G'sangln und Tanzen aus Tirol</td> <td>Mannheim, K. Ferd Heckel</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Dedication: Miss Jessi Henderson freundlichst gewidmet</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0388.pdf">SM-0388</a></td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Johannes Pugh</td> <td>Sonate</td> <td>Hamburg, Hercules Hinz</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Herrn Max Albert in Berlin</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0389.pdf">SM-0389</a></td> <td>C. Olaf Sodahl</td> <td>C. Olaf Sodahl</td> <td>Khorassan Patrol (Oriental March)</td> <td>C. O. G. Sodahl, East San Diego, California</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter / Stamped: From Franz Schwarzer, Washington, MO. / Voices: Piano or Zither, Violin or Mandolin</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/sm0390.pdf">SM-0390</a></td> <td>Franz Macku</td> <td>Fr. Gutmann</td> <td>Herzliche Grüsse, Polka Francaise</td> <td>Röder, Dessau</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> </table> <p></p> <p></p><p>Charles Schroeter's collection also includes several music programs and other printed zither ephemera. These have been digitized and are provided in the following table.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/ze.jpg" /><br /> </center><br /> <center><b>Zither Ephemera</b></center> <table border="1"> <td><b>Index</b></td> <td><b>Description</b></td> <td><b>Notes</b></td> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0001.pdf">ZE-0001</a></td> <td>Music Program / Zither Quartett Zürich / Kongresshaus Zürich / Sonntag, den 23. Februar 1958, nacm. 16 Uhr</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0002.pdf">ZE-0002</a></td> <td>Schweizerischer Landessender Beromünster "Die Konzert - Zither"</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0003.pdf">ZE-0003</a></td> <td>Zitherverein Schaffhausen / Jubiläums-Konzert, Sonntag, den 7. November 1965, um 16 Uhr im "Kronenhof" Schaffhausen</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0004.pdf">ZE-0004</a></td> <td>Zitherquartett Zurich / Kongresshaus Zürich / Sonntag, 15. September 1957, 16 Uhr</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0005.pdf">ZE-0005</a></td> <td>Zitherquartett Zurich / Kongresshaus Zurich / Samstag 30. Mai 1958, 19 h 30</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0006.pdf">ZE-0006</a></td> <td>Einladung zum Konzert des Zithertrio Basel / Samstag, den 15. Februar 1958, 20 Uhr</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0007.pdf">ZE-0007</a></td> <td>Mein Saitenspiel / Nummer 7, XI. Jahrgang, Bochum-Langendrer, Okt./Nov. 1958</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0008.pdf">ZE-0008</a></td> <td>Zither Quartett Zürich / Kongresshaus Zürich / Sonntag, den 3. März 1957, nachmittags 16 Uhr</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="files/ze0009.pdf">ZE-0009</a></td> <td>Nachrichten des Musikverlages Karl Schneiders / Nr. 2 1956/1957</td> <td>Code: O / Donated in memory of Charles Schroeter</td> </tr> </table> <p></p><center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p>Do you have vintage zither sheet music that you would like to share with the community? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</p> </div> Sun, 30 Jun 2013 23:16:05 +0000 davidkyger 124 at http://zither.us A Songbird for the Zither http://zither.us/zitherist.alberta.krader <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">A Songbird for the Zither</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-06-20T01:17:01+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 06/20/2013 - 01:17</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>Born in New York, zitherist Alberta Krader was a music teacher by profession and toured extensively with vaudeville, where she introduced zither music to thousands. Whether in the classroom, as a zither soloist or radio perfomer, her efforts to promote and preserve music lasted a lifetime. In later years she formed the Los Angeles Zither Ensemble, which was frequently called upon to perform at folk festivals and other public venues.</i><br /> </p><center><img src="files/fslogo.png" /><br /> </center> <p>Alberta Krader, née Buser, was born in New York on March 20, 1886, the daughter of Ferdinand Buser, a Swiss baker, and Meta Buser, also born in New York but of German ancestry. While a young girl, the family relocated to New Castle, Pennsylvania, where here father, Ferdinand, continued in his profession, opening a bakery, with younger brother Alphonse driving the baker's wagon.</p> <p>In New Castle, Alberta gained public notoriety whether playing zither solos at the local church, or singing in musical productions. Soon, newspapers were reporting on the hometown girl who was making good in Vaudeville. Traveling the circuit, she performed with the "Swiss Song Birds," in presentations of "A Day in the Alps," and as the "Tyrolienne Songbird." Her days in Vaudeville brought zither music to tens of thousands of people.</p> <div style="float: right"><img hspace="10" vspace="10" src="files/akrader.jpg" /><i></i><center>Alberta Krader, KDKA promotional photo, circa 1920s</center></div> <p>After New Castle, Alberta moved to Bellefonte, PA. When not performing in Vaudeville, she worked as a teacher, promoting an interest in music to the youth in her community. In fact, the importance of music was expressed unanimously by participants of the Sixth Congress of the United Zither Players of America, held in 1922 in Minneapolis and St. Paul. At the gathering, where Alberta was elected second vice-president of the organization, participants unanimously supported a plea by "The Music Trades" editor, John C. Freund. Intended to impress politicians with the idea that “music is essential to development of a cultural America and not merely a luxury for the few,” the zitherists resolved to “work toward having music made a part of the study curriculum of every school in the country.”</p> <p>In a parade given in her home town of Bellefonte, the Chamber of Commerce float boasted "Queen of the Zither," with Alberta sitting on top, zither in hand, greeting the community. Likewise, in 1939, she was honored to represent the zither enterprise in Washington, Missouri's centennial celebration, where she rode a float in the parade with Albert Hesse. Although interest in the zither had waned over the past several years, the citizens of Washington were no less proud of their enterprise. Albert Hesse was the last worker at the Franz Schwarzer Zither Company and in his remaining years, he was engaged solely in instrument repair and making strings. </p> <p>The downward turn for the zither continued, despite the bump provided by the movie "The Third Man." Alberta, now living in California, was certainly facing into the wind in her efforts to share zither music. In the early 1950s, the Franz Schwarzer Zither Company closed. Zither clubs had dwindled significantly, with Milwaukee and Chicago remaining as hubs of zither club activity. Even so, at the annual concert of the Milwaukee Zither Club "Alpenklänge" in 1953, Alberta was there, lending star power, participating with the orchestra and performing solo. </p> <p>Living in Los Angeles, Alberta was ideally situated to provide services to the entertainment industry. She taught music at the Radio Center Academy in Hollywood, and was asked on occasion to provide zither music for a movie, or to teach an actor zither basics in order to be passable in a film as an experienced zither player. Around her the "Los Angeles Zither Ensemble" formed. The group performed at folk festivals and charity events in the city.</p> <p>Alberta Krader passed away in 1966, at 80 years of age. Her love of music and the zither continued through her students and ensemble members. After her passing, Jane Weidhofer and King Keyes continued to perform in public and provided zither lessons to those interested in getting started. Jane remembered Alberta's fondness for zither music composed by Hans Dondl, and how she would enthusiastically distribute the various voices of a new song to the group. Many benefited from King's "The Teacher's Table" contributions to early editions of Zither Newsletter USA and his comprehensive tutorial for the zither, <a href="files/keyes_scales_arpeggios.pdf">Mastering The Scales and Arpeggios</a>.<br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/laze.jpg" /><br /><br /> <b>The Los Angeles Zither Ensemble, circa 1960s</b><br /> <br />Back row: Alma [?], Angela Bow, Jane Weidhofer, Mitzi Scherer <p>Middle row: Emmy Walker (guitar) , King Keyes, Alberta Krader, Andy Koller, Frances Koller (guitar)</p> <p>Front row: Mary Leitner, Peter Walker (mandolin), Sue Scheurman<br /> </p></center><br /> <br /><br /> <center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p><i>Thank you to Jane Weidhofer and Lavana Brechbiel for sharing their recollections and the photographs used in this article. Do you have a story or photograph that you would like to share with the zither community? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</i></p> </div> Thu, 20 Jun 2013 01:17:01 +0000 davidkyger 119 at http://zither.us Buffalo Zither Club http://zither.us/node/123 <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Buffalo Zither Club</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-05-24T02:47:48+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 05/24/2013 - 02:47</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>Thank you to Anna Mayerhofer for sharing this 1917 photo of the Buffalo Zither Club. This photo also includes her grandfather Josef Mayerhofer, seated to the far right in the front row. Josef was born in Dingolfing, Germany, in 1875. Anna included the following note regarding her family's history: "As I understand, my grandfather tremendously enjoyed playing the zither and apparently was quite good. In Germany, my grandfather met my grandmother, Anna Allmanshofer at the Wirtshaus in Gottfrieding which was owned by the Allmanshofer family. A mutual friendship developed through both of them playing the zither. </i><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/bzc-1917.jpg" /><br /><br /> </center> <!--break--><p><br /><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p>Do you have a zither photograph of historical interest that you would like to share with the community? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</p> </div> Fri, 24 May 2013 02:47:48 +0000 davidkyger 123 at http://zither.us Zitherist Henry Nowak http://zither.us/node/121 <span property="schema:name" class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Zitherist Henry Nowak</span> <span rel="schema:author" class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">davidkyger</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2013-02-01T02:58:35+00:00" class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 02/01/2013 - 02:58</span> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><i>This historic zither photo from 1932 comes to us courtesy of Pat Mohre, great-granddaughter of Henry Nowak, shown here with one of his early zithers. After a long run in Vaudeville, Henry Nowak settled in Chicago where he and his ensemble performed regularly in the Bierstube of the Bismarck Hotel. For more information on the life of Henry Nowak, see his story <a href="zitherist.henry.nowak">"What is a Symphonichord?"</a></i><br /> </p><center><br /> <img src="files/henrynowak.jpg" /><br /><br /> </center><br /> <br /><br /> <center><br /> <img src="files/gwimage1.gif" /><br /> </center> <p>Do you have a zither photograph of historical interest that you would like to share with the community? If so, email <a href="mailto:dave@zither.us">dave@zither.us</a>, or use the provided <a href="http://www.zither.us/contact">contact</a> form.</p> </div> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 02:58:35 +0000 davidkyger 121 at http://zither.us